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Wednesday, April 19, 2017

KEITH WILLIAMS VS. RAYMOURS FURNITURE CO., INC. A-3450-15T4


KEITH WILLIAMS VS. RAYMOURS FURNITURE CO., INC.
          A-3450-15T4
The Division of Workers' Compensation dismissed the petition of Keith Williams for lack of jurisdiction. The judge of compensation determined that because Williams worked in New York and the accident happened there, there was no reason for New Jersey to assume jurisdiction of Williams' claim. We reverse.
As the facts are undisputed that Williams accepted employment from respondent by telephone from his home in Paterson, thereby establishing New Jersey as the place the contract was created, the law is clear that New Jersey is an appropriate forum for resolution of petitioner's claim petition, certainly in conjunction with his residency here. 

JACLYN THOMPSON VS. BOARD OF TRUSTEES, TEACHERS' PENSION AND ANNUITY FUND A-5028-14T1


JACLYN THOMPSON VS. BOARD OF TRUSTEES, TEACHERS' PENSION AND ANNUITY FUND
A-5028-14T1
Patterson v. Bd. of Trs., State Police Ret. Sys., 194 N.J. 29, 34 (2008), held that to obtain accidental disability benefits for a purely mental disability, "[t]he disability must result from direct personal experience of a terrifying or horror-inducing event that involves actual or threatened death or serious injury, or a similarly serious threat to the physical integrity of the member or another person." Following the example of Russo v. Bd. of Trs., Police & Firemen's Ret. Sys., 206 N.J. 14 (2011), the Appellate Division holds the Patterson requirement applies to mental disability arising from incidents involving mental and physical stressors if any physical injury was temporary or minor, despite Caminiti v. Bd. of Trs., Police & Firemen's Ret. Sys., 431 N.J. Super. 1 (App. Div. 2013).
The majority rules that the incidents triggering petitioner's mental disability did not meet the Patterson requirement and that her diagnosis of PTSD was not dispositive. Judge Ostrer dissents from that ruling.
The court rules the incidents were undesigned and unexpected given petitioner's lack of training. 

NEW YORK-CONNECTICUT DEVELOPMENT CORP. VS. BLINDS-TO- GO

NEW YORK-CONNECTICUT DEVELOPMENT CORP. VS. BLINDS-TO- GO (U.S.) INC. VS. ANTHONY NARDOZZI, ET AL.
UNIQUE MECHANICAL SERVICES, LLC. VS. NEW YORK- CONNECTICUT DEVELOPMENT CORP.

COUNTY GLASS & METAL INSTALLERS, INC. VS. NEW YORK- CONNECTICUT DEVELOPMENT CORP., ET AL.
A-5660-14T4

page2image14280 page2image14440 page2image14600 page2image14760 page2image14920 page2image15080
In this matter arising out of the construction of a building, we address whether a verdict can be sustained where the jury found that plaintiff, New York-Connecticut Development Corp. (NYCT), breached the pertinent contract, but nevertheless, awarded it damages under a quantum meruit theory.
Quantum meruit is a form of quasi-contractual recovery and is "wholly unlike an express or implied-in-fact contract in that it is 'imposed by the law for the purpose of bringing about justice without reference to the intention of the parties.'" St. Barnabas Med. Ctr. v. Cnty. of Essex, 111 N.J. 67, 79 (1988)
page2image20576 page2image20736

(citations omitted). It has long been recognized, however, "that the existence of an express contract excludes the awarding of relief regarding the same subject matter based on quantum meruit." Kas Oriental Rugs v. Ellman, 394 N.J. Super. 278, 286 (App. Div. 2007).
Although a party may plead and pursue alternative, and even inconsistent theories, Kas, supra, 394 N.J. Super. at 287, a party is not entitled to recover on inconsistent theories. Ibid. (emphasis added). Once the jury determined that an express contract existed between the parties, it was erroneous for it to be directed to a consideration of quantum meruit. The jury instructions and verdict sheet both misstated the applicable legal principles of contract law. Consequently, we are constrained to reverse and remand for a new trial. 

Sunday, April 9, 2017

STATE OF NEW JERSEY VS. MICHAEL D. MILLER A-0459-15T4


 STATE OF NEW JERSEY VS. MICHAEL D. MILLER 
A-0459-15T4 
Following a bench trial, defendant was convicted of second-degree child endangerment for distributing child pornography, N.J.S.A. 2C:24-4b(5)(a), and fourth-degree child endangerment by possessing child pornography, N.J.S.A. 2C:24-4b(5)(b). In affirming defendant's conviction, we hold that the trial court did not err in allowing a detective, who was not presented as an expert witness, to testify as a fact witness regarding his forensic examination of defendant's computer and defendant's use of peer-to-peer file sharing programs. In any event, any error 
in the admission of the challenged testimony was harmless as the detective possessed sufficient education, training, and experience to qualify as an expert in the field of computer forensics, and defendant was not surprised or prejudiced by the detective's testimony. 

We further hold that, in applying aggravating factor one, N.J.S.A. 2C:44-1(a)(1), the trial court engaged in impermissible double-counting. We also conclude that, under the specific facts presented, defendant's convictions for fourth-degree possession of child pornography and second-degree distribution of child pornography merge. Accordingly, we remand for the court to resentence defendant without consideration of aggravating factor one, and for merger of the two offenses. 

N.E., AS LEGAL GUARDIAN FOR INFANT J.V. VS. STATE OF NEW JERSEY, ET AL. A-3717-13T2

N.E., AS LEGAL GUARDIAN FOR INFANT J.V. VS. STATE OF NEW JERSEY, ET AL. 
A-3717-13T2 
Plaintiff is the legal guardian of a child who was severely and permanently injured by the criminal acts of his biological father. Plaintiff filed a civil action against the Division and a caseworker, and his supervisor claiming it was vicariously liable for the negligent manner these employees investigated plaintiff's allegations of child abuse and parental unfitness. The trial court rejected the Division’s argument that its employees are entitled to immunity from civil liability under the Tort Claims Act. A jury found the Division 100 percent liable and awarded plaintiff a total of $165,972,503. 

In this appeal, this court is required to determine whether the State of New Jersey can be held vicariously liable based on a Division caseworker’s good faith execution of this State’s child protection laws. This court holds the Division caseworkers were entitled to the qualified immunity afforded to public employees who act in good faith in the enforcement or execution of any law under N.J.S.A. 59:3-3 of the Tort Claims Act. An ordinary negligence standard is an insufficient basis to impose civil liability on a public employee involved in the execution of the law. For these reasons, this court reverses the jury's verdict and vacates the final judgment entered against defendants. 

Michael Conley, Jr. v. Mona Guerrero (A-65-15;


 Michael Conley, Jr. v. Mona Guerrero (A-65-15; 076928) 

In this case, because Buyers received actual notice of disapproval within the three-day attorney-review period by a method of communication commonly used in the industry, the notice of disapproval was valid. The Court also exercises its constitutional authority over the practice of law and finds that an attorney’s notice of disapproval of a real estate contract may be transmitted by fax, e-mail, personal delivery, or overnight mail with proof of delivery. Notice by overnight mail will be effective upon mailing. The attorney-review period within which this notice must be sent remains three business days. 

Sunday, April 2, 2017

RICHMOND LAPOLLA VS. COUNTY OF UNION, ET AL. A-2411-14T3

 RICHMOND LAPOLLA VS. COUNTY OF UNION, ET AL. 
A-2411-14T3 

Plaintiff claimed to be the victim of political patronage, suffering adverse employment actions in part because his politically active brother sparred with the chairwoman of the Union County Democratic Party. Plaintiff's appeal from the dismissal of his complaint presents the question whether his familial and social affiliations qualify as constitutionally protected conduct that satisfies an essential element of his claims for violation of the New Jersey Civil Rights Act (NJCRA), N.J.S.A. 10:6-1 to -2, and retaliation. We hold that they do not. 

IN THE MATTER OF JOHN RESTREPO, DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS A-2951-14T4

IN THE MATTER OF JOHN RESTREPO, DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS 
A-2951-14T4 
After an ALJ reduced a corrections officer's disciplinary sanction, the Civil Service Commission (Commission) issued a preliminary decision within forty-five days and obtained two fifteen-day extensions before issuing its final determination reinstating his termination. His appeal raises the issue of whether the timeliness of Commission decisions in disciplinary cases involving law enforcement officers and firefighters is governed by the recent legislation addressing such cases, N.J.S.A. 40A:14-200 to -212 (2009 Act), or by the Administrative Procedure Act (APA), N.J.S.A. 52:14B-1 to -15. 

The Appellate Division holds the specific 2009 Act governs the conflicting provisions of the general APA. Under N.J.S.A. 40A:14-204, the Commission's extensions were proper. Its lack of a quorum was an adequate grounds for an extension. Thus, its decision was timely even though its preliminary decision was inadequate. The court upheld the Commission's decision that progressive discipline was not required. 

Motorworld, Inc. v. William Benkendorf, et al. (A-64-15;


 Motorworld, Inc. v. William Benkendorf, et al. 
(A-64-15; 077009) 

The record reveals no reason to abandon the corporate form. By virtue of the Release, Motorworld received no value at all, let alone value commensurate with the loss of its sole asset: a debt in the amount of $600,000 plus accumulating interest and penalties. The disputed transfer was not made for “reasonably equivalent value” under N.J.S.A. 25:2-27(a), and plaintiffs established all elements of a constructively fraudulent transfer.